Wednesday, January 5, 2011

Another Partial Pattern to Share

Wow, since shutting down the Etsy store, I'm realizing how many crochet patterns I had squirreled away here on my computer!

Like the bear ears pattern from a few days ago, this is another partial pattern. Tonight, it's bunny ears, made to go on your beanie of choice.

Whatever hook size you use for the base hat, use for the ears as well.
2 colors and types of yarn: Chenille for the outside ears will be heavy and warm, but it would be too heavy for both the insides and outsides. A medium nylon/acrylic blend would be very limp for both the insides and outsides.

Inside of the ears, done in either a contrasting or lighter shade of yarn from what the outside of the ears are done in. Make 2 separate insides.

Row 1: Chain 8-10. The ears are worked horizontally.
Row 2: Do a DC in the second chain from the end of the hook. 1 DC in each stitch. Chain 2 at the end and turn.
Row 3:1 DC in each stitch again. Chain 2 at the end and turn. *Repeat this until the inside of the ear is as long as you want it.

On the last 2-3 rows, decrease each row by 1 stitch in the middle of each row, to create a rounded off appearance. This should leave you with 3-4 DC in the center, plus one DC on each outside edge, for 5-6 total DC.

Finish off the yarn and weave in ends. You will end at the top of the inside ear.

After doing two of these pieces, with an I sized hook at 11” long, 10 DC wide, with a bulky yarn (Patons Glittallic), these almost finish off an entire skein (60 yards).

For more detail, go back with the inside ear color and do 2 rows of vertical SC’s up the inside pieces, from the bottom edges up, for 2 different lengths. Finish off the yarn and weave in the edges.

Outside of the ears, done in either a contrasting or lighter shade of yarn from what the outside of the ears are done in. Make 2 separate outsides.

Give yourself a length of 6-8” of unused yarn before you start (This will be what you use to attach the ear to the hat.).

Row 1: Chain 12. Do a DC in the second chain from the end of the hook.
Row 2: 1 DC in each stitch. Chain 2 at the end and turn.
Row 3: 1 DC in each stitch again. Chain 2 at the end and turn. *Repeat this until the inside of the ear (working from side to side) is as long as you want it, making sure it is longer than the inside pieces.

On the last 2-3 rows, decrease each row by 2 stitches (at the beginning and end of each row), to create a rounded off appearance. This should leave you with 3-4 DC in the center, plus one DC on each outside edge, for 5-6 total DC.

Finish off the yarn and weave in ends. You will end at the top of the outside ear. After doing two of these pieces, with an I sized hook at 13” long, 10 DC wide, with a medium yarn (Moda-Dea Dream), these almost finish off a half skein (about 49 yards).

Lay the outside pieces flat and lay the inside pieces flat on top of them, so the bottom edges are together. Using a yarn needle, use the several inches of outside ear piece to sew the insides and outsides together, using the edges of the insides to guide you. Finish off the yarn.

Once the pieces are combined, go back with the outside ear color and SC along the inside edges. This will cover the outside color where the pieces were sewn together, as well as give the ear a little more “depth.” Finish off the yarn and weave in the edges.

Sew the completed ears to the hat with the same outside color yarn, on top of the head.

Sunday, January 2, 2011

Newboy Cap Pattern

On the crochet sites I frequent, I've seen more and more newsboy style caps appearing. I figure that with the two fun winter hats I have (Jack Skellington and now R2-D2), I should probably make at least one that looks a little more adult-ish. This pattern from FavCrafts was the one I chose.

I made mine with Lion Brand Homespun in Baroque (shades of purple ), which is a boucle yarn, and some unknown (probably Lion Brand again) chenille in jewel tones.

You really have to pay attention to this pattern and it would help to read this one through once before actually starting it. I realized at what I thought was row 13 that I had been missing several rows. The pattern is worded as, "Rnd 4 (And All Even Rnds): Sc in each sc around." I had missed the "and all even rounds" part and according to the comments on this page, I wasn't the only one. Pulling out boucle yarn will make the nicest person swear but somehow, I was able to do it successfully and get the pattern going correctly.

The pattern calls for a piece of plastic canvas to be placed inside the brim to give it some shape and sturdiness. For mine, I used a piece of clean milk jug instead. You don't need a very large piece, so if you buy only a quart of milk at a time, you should still be able to work with that. The most important thing is that it's flat. And it's good recycling too!

If I'm not wearing purple, then I'm just not dressed!
Instead of making a couple of buttons to go on the hat, I dug through my stash to see what I had in purple. I wanted a couple of mismatched ones.
God, I hate doing self portraits!

I made another newsboy type cap a few years ago. It was the Suede Cap from Lion Brand (you'll need to create a user name and login with Lion Brand in order to see their free patterns, but it's worth it. And you won't get spammed from them either.).

I didn't end up liking this one. Mine didn't come out with that angled shape to the front and the brim looked like hell on mine. I would have liked the Newsboy Cap I made better with a longer brim like this one from Lion Brand though.

But the one I made is good because there's enough room in it that I can tuck my ears into it easily for when it's cold enough outside for a hat. My ears are kind of big, so the model in the picture up on top can get away with having the hat sit above her ears. 

A Yarn Bomber Attacks Wall Street

I think this yarn bomber must be the same one from the bombed bicycle.

"As many Americans were spending Christmas night with their families, Olek, a New York based artist was near Wall Street, freezing her fingers to the bone while outfitting the famous "Charging Bull" into a giant knitted cozy.

"Why did she feel compelled to crochet a sweater for the brass Bull? Partly, it was because of the economy and partly because she was homesick.

"'I wanted to make it for all those people who couldn't make it to their families and for those people who don't have coats and don't have any money.'"

This is so cool to me. She took her own time and money to create something artistic like that bull cozy.

"But like much "guerrilla art," Olek's work was not on display for long. She says the caretaker of the park tore it apart early in the morning. (What a killjoy!)

"Still, Olek remains optimistic about the future. 'I really hope that I can do it again. This crocheted cover represents my best wishes to all of us. It will be a great, prosperous year with many wonderful surprises!'"

She has this great video of her putting the cozy on the bull, as well! Be sure to check out her little ladder. It's even been yarn bombed with that same pink and purple camouflage yarn. She seems to use a lot of that kind of yarn pattern. And if you think the bull and bike are interesting, then you need to take a look at her website too.

A Partial Pattern To Share

To go along with all the devil horns hats I've made, I was also asked to make a teddy bear ear hat as well for a friend's daughter a couple years ago. Since the hat itself really isn't important, you can use any beanie pattern you want.

Two colors and types of yarn: use a lightweight or medium thickness yarn (100% acrylic) is your best bet. Lion Brand Chenille Thick and Quick or some other super chunky yarn is going to be too thick.

For the first time, I used Caron Simply Soft in Bone 2604 and some unknown pink.

Outside of the ears. Make 2 separate insides.
Leave a length of yard of about 10” before starting chain. This becomes the yarn you’ll use to attach the ear to the hat.

Use a G sized hook. Chain 10.

Row 1: Do a HDC in the second chain from the end of the hook. HDC in each after that and increase by 1 HDC in the last HDC. Chain 2 at the end and turn.
Row 2: 1 HDC in each stitch. Chain 2 at the end and turn.
Row 3: 1 HDC in each stitch. Chain 2 at the end and turn.
Row 4: 1 HDC in each stitch and decrease by 1 HDC at the end of the row (do the decrease in the third and second HDC’s from the end). Chain 2 at the end and turn.
Row 5: 1 HDC in each stitch and skip the first HDC at the beginning of the row. Chain 2 at the end and turn. Finish off yarn.

Inside of the ears. Make 2 separate outsides.
Leave a length of yard of about 10” before starting chain. This becomes the yarn you’ll use to attach the ear to the hat.

Use a G sized hook. Chain 10.

Row 1: Do 2 SCs in the second chain from the end of the hook. SC in each stitch after that. Chain 1 at the end and turn.
Row 2: 1 SC in each stitch and increase by 1 SC at the end of the row (in the last SC). Chain 1 at the end and turn.
Row 3: 1 SC in each stitch and increase by 1 SC in the first SC (in the beginning of the row). Chain 1 at the end and turn.
Row 4: 1 SC in each stitch. Chain 1 at the end and turn.
Row 5: Skip the first SC in the row. SC in each other SC. Chain 1 at the end and turn.
Row 6: SC in each stitch and decrease by 1 SC at the end of the row (third and second to last SC). Chain 1 at the end and turn.
Row 7: Skip the first SC in the row. 1 SC in each other SC. Fasten off yarn.

Lay the outside pieces flat and lay the inside pieces flat on top of them, so the bottom edges are together. Using a yarn needle, use the several inches of outside ear piece to sew the insides and outsides together, using the edges of the insides to guide you. Finish off the yarn.

Once the pieces are combined, go back with the outside ear color and a E sized hook to SC along the inside edges. This will cover the outside color where the pieces were sewn together, as well as give the ear a little more “depth.” Finish off the yarn and weave in the edges.

Sew the completed ears to the hat with the same outside color yarn, on top of the head.